Keep Your Greek (23)

Encouragement, Comments & Other Information:

For the participle quiz below, I will now focus on the top 20 participles by NT word count. It will still be one per week and this should help provide a more efficient mode of memorising these popular NT irregular verbs and should assist in translation.

Regarding the paradigms, I am cycling through each of the indicative, subjunctive, imperative and infinitives, while moving through the participles at the same time. The grammar that I have gleaned and collated these from, is by Dr Greg Forbes from Melbourne School of Theology. I have attached my PDF here for your reference: NT Greek Paradigms.

Paradigms:
Write out or recite the Aorist, Middle, Imperative, of λυω – to loose
(1s)
(2s)
(3s)
(1p)
(2p)
(3p)

Write out or recite the 1st Aorist, Active, Participle, Masculine of λυω – to loose
(Ns)
(Gs)
(Ds)
(As)
(Np)
(Gp)
(Dp)
(Ap)

Principal Parts:
Write out or recite the principal parts for λεγω – to say (1 – Used 2353 times in NT)
(Present Active)
(Future Active)
(Aorist Active)
(Perfect Active)
(Perfect Passive)
(Aorist Passive)

Greek Reading and Translation
Each day read through the 10 verses below and translate each of them over the coming week. (To assist with your translation you can work directly in an Excel spreadsheet or print off a PDF copy for handwritten translations)
Excel: (23) John 6.9-6.18
PDF: (23) John 6.9-6.18

(John 6:9-18 NA28-Mounce)
9 ἔστιν παιδάριον ὧδε ὃς ἔχει πέντε ἄρτους κριθίνους καὶ δύο ὀψάρια · ἀλλὰ ταῦτα τί ἐστιν εἰς τοσούτους ; 10 εἶπεν ὁ Ἰησοῦς · ποιήσατε τοὺς ἀνθρώπους ἀναπεσεῖν. ἦν δὲ χόρτος πολὺς ἐν τῷ τόπῳ. ἀνέπεσαν οὖν οἱ ἄνδρες τὸν ἀριθμὸν ὡς πεντακισχίλιοι. 11 ἔλαβεν οὖν τοὺς ἄρτους ὁ Ἰησοῦς καὶ εὐχαριστήσας διέδωκεν τοῖς ἀνακειμένοις ὁμοίως καὶ ἐκ τῶν ὀψαρίων ὅσον ἤθελον. 12 ὡς δὲ ἐνεπλήσθησαν, λέγει τοῖς μαθηταῖς αὐτοῦ · συναγάγετε τὰ περισσεύσαντα κλάσματα, ἵνα μή τι ἀπόληται. 13 συνήγαγον οὖν καὶ ἐγέμισαν δώδεκα κοφίνους κλασμάτων ἐκ τῶν πέντε ἄρτων τῶν κριθίνων ἃ ἐπερίσσευσαν τοῖς βεβρωκόσιν. 14 Οἱ οὖν ἄνθρωποι ἰδόντες ὃ ἐποίησεν σημεῖον ἔλεγον ὅτι οὗτός ἐστιν ἀληθῶς ὁ προφήτης ὁ ἐρχόμενος εἰς τὸν κόσμον. 15 Ἰησοῦς οὖν γνοὺς ὅτι μέλλουσιν ἔρχεσθαι καὶ ἁρπάζειν αὐτὸν ἵνα ποιήσωσιν βασιλέα, *ἀνεχώρησεν πάλιν εἰς τὸ ὄρος αὐτὸς μόνος. 16 Ὡς δὲ ὀψία ἐγένετο κατέβησαν οἱ μαθηταὶ αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ τὴν θάλασσαν 17 καὶ ἐμβάντες εἰς πλοῖον ἤρχοντο πέραν τῆς θαλάσσης εἰς Καφαρναούμ. καὶ σκοτία ἤδη ἐγεγόνει καὶ οὔπω ἐληλύθει πρὸς αὐτοὺς ὁ Ἰησοῦς, 18 ἥ τε θάλασσα ἀνέμου μεγάλου πνέοντος διεγείρετο.

Grammar
Each day this week, skim read through a chapter of your first Greek Grammar or one you are familiar with. (skim reading a specific chapter, either sequentially or randomly, and completing it each day of the week will re-enforce foundational topics and help to move them into long term memory)

Keep Your Greek (23)
Continue reading for Quiz answers.

Answers to Keep Your Greek (23)

Paradigms:
Write out or recite the Aorist, Middle, Imperative, of λυω – to loose
(1s)
(2s) λυ σαι
(3s) λυ σασθω
(1p)
(2p) λυ σασθε
(3p) λυ σασθωσαν

Write out or recite the 1st Aorist, Active, Participle, Masculine of λυω – to loose
(Ns) λυ σας
(Gs) λυ σαντος
(Ds) λυ σαντι
(As) λυ σαντα
(Np) λυ σαντες
(Gp) λυ σαντων
(Dp) λυ σασιν
(Ap) λυ σαντας

Principal Parts – Top 20 by Word Frequency:
Write out or recite the principal parts for λεγω – to say (1 – Used 2353 times in NT)
(Present Active) λεγω
(Future Active) ἐρω
(Aorist Active) εἰπον
(Perfect Active) εἰρηκα
(Perfect Passive) εἰρημαι
(Aorist Passive) ἐρρεθην, ἐρρηθην

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2 thoughts on “Keep Your Greek (23)

  1. Hi Tony:
    I enjoyed, as always, reading your posts. A few comments about this amazing text. 1). Jesus is showing Himself to be the Ultimate Good shepherd, leading the sheep to green pastures so-to-speak ἦν δὲ χόρτος πολὺς ἐν τῷ τόπῳ (6:10). This sequence of events and the feeding of the five thousand miracle is setting up the reader for what will be Jesus confession of Himself as being the Bread of Life later on in John 6.

    2). When He breaks the bread and fish and “blesses” it, He is showing how He is able to be the “bread of life” by feeding the people. Undoubtedly, He is showing how He fulfills in an ultimate sense the manna that God gave to the people in the wilderness in passages like Numbers 16. Sadly, the outcome of response of the people in John 6 ends up being very similar to that first generation of Israelites in Numbers: grumbling, complaining and unbelief.

    3). In John 6:12, we see the first aorist passive third masculine verb “ἐνεπλήσθησαν”, which in its verbal aspect, speaks of a simple event that took place. With the other particles “ὡς δὲ” prefacing the verb, we now can appropriately see the timing of the filling of the people with food (a consummative aorist, which speaks of the event as reaching its fully matured and realized point). The filling of the people was used as Jesus’ reference point for then instructing his disciples to gather up the leftovers. Everything in this miracle had well-timed sub-elements that worked together to communicate the fact that Jesus alone could fill those in attendance. I heard one teacher comment once that the amount of leftovers, 12 baskets ( συνήγαγον οὖν καὶ ἐγέμισαν δώδεκα κοφίνους κλασμάτων 6:13), corresponded to the twelve tribes of Israel. The feeding of the five thousand was meant to communicate to the Jews that Jesus was the bread of life, sent down from heaven, to save them.

    4). As a final thought, Jesus’ exercise of authority over the Sea of Galilee following the miracle of the feeding of the 5,000 signalled His Sovereignty over all things. The Jews knew God ruled over the land, but many oof them feared bodies of water like the Sea of Galilee, since sudden storms would appear and their idea of “the depths” was used often to describe judgment (see 6:18 ἥ τε θάλασσα ἀνέμου μεγάλου πνέοντος διεγείρετο). Just as Yahweh had exercised jurisdiction over the Red Sea in Exodus, Jesus was showing Himself as Yahweh, God in human flesh in His exercise of authority over the Sea of Galilee. Blessings Tony!

    Liked by 1 person

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